Comedy, Drama, Japan, Reviews

About the Pink Sky

Japanese director Keiichi Kobayashi’s debut film, which won Japanese Eyes Best Picture Award in Tokyo International Film Festival 2011 and was invited to the Sundance Film Festival 2012…

What is it about About the Pink Sky that attracts me?

About the Pink Sky has everything that’s important in an entertainment film: proper development of new and original characters. Izumi, a high school girl who reviews newspaper articles, has the quality of those teenagers in films like Shunji Iwai’s Hana to Alice or Typhoon Club by Shinji Somai. I was engaged by the character. Some would say the story is mundane; no fascinating events happen in the film. However, in this film the story is not so important — nor is black and white. New character is what’s necessary, such as in John Ford’s films, where peculiarity creates character.

The film succeeds with its portrayal of the teenager. Family and teachers disappear, similar to Iwai and Somai’s style. The story begins when Izumi finds a wallet with 300,000 yen inside on the road. She decides not to return it. She lends money to an acquaintance, then spends more for her friends in a cafe. One day, her friend Akemi notes that the wallet’s owner, Sato, is actually a cool guy, so she is obligated to return the wallet as soon as possible. Her purpose is then to see Sato. Izumi is now involved with her friend and Sato.

About the Pink Sky indulges into the insight of a Japanese director. He destroys stereotypes with fascinating characters. For example, why do Japanese ask “How old are you?” for the first time? To understand “your position:” if you’re 28 years old, you’re a salesman, not a university student. In other words, assumptions are important. You listen carefully to what Izumi says, and then you have to listen carefully for the answer. Izumi brings hope for future directors in Japan. There are some other hopefuls presently. Keichi also tries to destroy stereotypes through new characters. This is through a style of entertainment that doesn’t use force.

Why are we impressed by Jaws, Back to the Future, or Batman? What did we get from those films? They all have a dark present and hopeful future. About the Pink Sky is the same. I’m excited to see the truth of entertainment films appearing in Japan.

About the author

Yoshito Seino
My dream is to make Japanese film becoming a mainstream in the world. I want to establish business of Japanese film for international market in the future. Film critics are significant element for getting new audience, I wish to connect with you through reviews... More »
Trap_Street-Toronto_Clip-trailer

On this day One year ago

Trap Street

A cautionary tale for our modern love of technology and surveillance paranoia in Vivian Qu's striking debut… Li Qiuming (Lu Yulai, Soundless Wind Chime, Peacock, The Last Supper, The Red Awn) meets Guan Lifen (He ... Read on

On this day Eight years ago

Re-Cycle

The Pang Brothers reunite with the star of The Eye for another imaginative horror... After The Eye 10, the second sequel and a shameless cash-in to the series that helped make directors the Pang Brother's ... Read on

Never miss a post

Subscribe to our weekly newsletter and you'll never miss a review, interview or competition. We'll send you an update of all the most recent posts, and the occasional email for special events like festival coverage.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>